Jeremy Lepisto’s painted, coldworked and fused glass sculptures are an exploration of the everyday landscapes and the condition of spaces we all share.  Jeremy’s detailed landscapes are painted on sheets of glass that are constructed into three-dimensional forms to achieve great visual depth and a distinct perspective.  Finding inspiration in the silhouettes and lines of urban architecture, such as the facades of buildings and the tangle of city power lines, Jeremy’s work encourages us to question and re-look at the surroundings we usually take for granted.  Jeremy’s has addressed the need and want for goods that are “unorderable, un-receivable and/or undeliverable”.  Notions of transience and recollection appear in the sculptures that physically represent the form of a shipping crate or container, but depict objects and ideas that are simply unobtainable.  In his most recent work, Jeremy explores “structures that are purpose built to contain and supply needed/wanted provisions.  I believe that the availability of these common structures and the amount of resources held within each can reveal much about the ability and the ampleness of the livelihoods that they supply.”

Jeremy Lepisto completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts, majoring in metals and glass, at the New York College of Ceramics at Alfred University in 1997.  He has worked extensively as a technical assistant, guest lecturer and instructor in workshops and universities across the United States, United Kingdom and Australia.  Jeremy served as the president of the Glass Art Society in the United States for three years and has begun a PhD in sculpture at the ANU School of Art.  Jeremy’s work is represented in the collections of the Glasmuseum (Ebeltoft, Denmark), Museum of Northwest Art (La Conner, USA), Knoxville Museum (USA) and Museum of Glass (Tacoma, USA).

Jeremy
Lepisto

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>Craft Arts no. 82 article

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